Science-Based Briefs

Men’s Health: Addressing Barriers to a Healthy Lifestyle and Preventative Care

Over the last century, life expectancy has slowly and steadily increased, which has been attributed to the evolution of medicine and changes in the American lifestyle, with an emphasis on healthier habits and regular exercise.  However, one thing that remains the same is the gender gap.   According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), women tend to live an average of 5 years longer than men.1  While this gender gap in life expectancy is not a new phenomenon, researchers suggest there are many reasons that contribute to this ratio shift that favors women. This includes biological factors such as hormonal influences on physiology and behavior, and environmental factors, such as cultural influences on gender differences in health behaviors.  As a result of perceived vulnerability, denial and traditional macho views on masculinity, men tend to underuse primary and mental health care services and are less likely to seek medical attention early and adhere to medical treatment, if diagnosed.2      

Learn more

Nutrition, Hormones & Health – Achieving Balance Naturally

Hormones are essential for life as they help to optimize all aspects of health and performance.  From growth development and reproduction to metabolism, mood and sleep cycles, hormones play a crucial role in many different processes in the body. While men and women have the same basic hormones, the levels of two of the major sex hormones, estrogen and progesterone, are generally higher for women with a vastly different pattern of production that changes over time and throughout their lifespan.  This makes hormonal balance especially critical for women’s health.  While this balance can be disrupted in many ways, including the natural fluctuations that occur during puberty and menopause, simple dietary and lifestyle changes can help restore proper levels of hormones.

Learn more

Investing in the Planet Through Budget-Friendly Dietary Practices

Over the last few years, a mounting body of research has shown that the current process of food production and consumption are major drivers of increases in greenhouse gas emissions, land and resource use, and adverse health effects.1 This is especially alarming considering society will have to provide food security for the growing global population while shifting to healthier diets.  Research examining the co-benefits of shifting to universally sustainable diets, that consider dietary needs, nutritional quality, and environmental footprints, may significantly reduce all-cause mortality and cancer risk, alongside a potential reduction in greenhouse gas emissions and land use.2 

Learn more

Protein: Debunking Myths & Uncovering Truths, Part 2 of Two-Part Protein Education Series

Aside from water, proteins are the most abundant molecules in the human body and is the major structural component of all cells.  In addition to helping the body repair cells and make new ones, protein is important for growth and development in children, teens, and pregnant women.  As humans age, it’s even more crucial to consume enough high-quality protein in the diet to better preserve muscle mass and strength, increase the body’s immune function, help decrease recovery time from illness, and maintain a certain quality of life.1

Learn more

Keep It Going: Turning Health Goals into Lifelong Habits

Every year, millions of Americans look to January as a time for a fresh start for their health and wellness goals. While the act of setting resolutions is easy, successfully implementing meaningful changes to one’s routine over the long run can be challenging.

Learn more

Exploring a Personalized Approach to Type 2 Diabetes Management

Diabetes is a monumental health crisis impacting our country. The CDC reports that 37.3 million Americans (11.3% of the US population) have diabetes, and 96 million American adults (38% of the US population) have prediabetes.1 Diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death in the United States...

Learn more